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Convention Progam

Wednesday, April 10

6:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Seminar 1 - PSHA Town Hall Meeting

This seminar will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of PSHA Executive Board members to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs and state licensure requirements. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Audience members will be given an opportunity to ask questions and contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of Pennsylvania licensure and certification requirements related to the schools.
  • Identify at least three issues impacting service delivery.
  • List pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

 

(Instruction Level: Intermediate)

8:15 pm to 9:15 pm

Seminar 2 - Professional Roundtable Discussions

These discussions will provide an opportunity for professionals to engage in dynamic roundtables to discuss important workplace issues with colleagues from across the state. We will have several roundtables to choose from including: early Intervention, school setting, acute/rehab setting, skilled nursing facility/home health, higher education and audiology. Each discussion will have a facilitator to encourage discussion points. It will be a great opportunity to share best practices, concerns and questions with colleagues in similar work settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe concerns facing professionals in specific work settings.
  • Describe best practices for assessment, treatment and documentation.
  • Describe strategies to improve professional service delivery.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Thursday, April 11

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Seminar 3 - Acceptance and Commitment Therapy 101: An Experiential Learning Session

Scott Palasik, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Akron; Jaime Michise, MS, CCC-SLP, University of North Texas/Private Practice

The field of communication disorders has a long history of counseling clients using psychotherapy techniques. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a mindfulness-based psychotherapy approach that assists clients in living a valued-based life through the development of psychological flexibility. Clients can cultivate psychological flexibility in order to cope with and manage their communication disorder by experiencing the six core principles of ACT: contact with the present moment, acceptance and willingness, thought defusion, self as context, defining values and committed action. By incorporating these principles into therapy, clinicians can guide their clients in practicing willingness to come in contact with all thoughts and feelings that may arise in a given moment. During this experiential training, presenters will guide attendees through exercises to help them better understand each core principle of ACT and provide clinical examples using ACT with individuals who stutter and individuals with other communication disorders. Furthermore, this seminar aims to provide functional activities that participants can use to complement their current clinical practices. All individual and small group activities will be followed by large group debriefings/discussions so that participants can ask questions and learn from each other.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the six core principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).
  • Define psychological flexibility.
  • Describe three ways to implement ACT into therapy sessions with people who stutter or people with other communication disorders.

 

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 4 - EBP vs PBE: While We all Scream for Ice Cream!

Pamela Smith, PhD, CCC-SLP, Bloomsburg University; James Lemma, MA, CCC-SLP, East Coast Dysphagia Management, LLC

Clinicians are encouraged to utilize evidence-based practice (EBP) in all aspects of care, but sometimes published evidence is inconclusive, incomplete or insufficient. Particularly in these cases, practitioners must consider other clinical variables and can also contribute practice-based evidence (PBE) to recommendations. A common clinical scenario centers around the viscosity classification of ice cream and the related factors contributing to the "safety" of this particular p.o. item. Clinical decision making requires reasoning and judgment across many different variables, including but not always limited to bolus viscosity. This seminar will discuss ice cream and similar frozen desserts and the different factors (physiological and bolus characteristics) that might impact patient management. The importance of instrumental assessment is emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the characteristics of evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence.
  • Describe three characteristics of ice cream besides viscosity that may influence its use in management of patients with dysphagia.
  • Describe at least four variables that contribute to potential negative consequences associated with aspiration.
  • Discuss the balancing of quality of life with aspiration risk in patients with dysphagia.

 

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Seminar 5 - Getting Started in Assessment/Treatment Planning for Children With Selective Mutism

Cesar Ruiz, SLPD, CCC-SLP; Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, from La Salle University

According to DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), selective mutism (SM) is considered an anxiety disorder which interferes with the ability to speak in specific social situations. While this disorder has not traditionally been treated by speech-language pathologists, it has become one that they encounter and are expected to evaluate and treat. Without formal training, it can be a difficult task to promote vocalizations from children who typically do not speak to professionals. Therefore, comprehensive evaluations are challenging but necessary to best help this population of children use their voice in settings outside their comfort zone. Although DSM-5 indicates that the failure to speak is not attributable to a lack of knowledge of, or comfort with, the spoken language required in the social situation, and is not better explained by a communication disorder, latent profile analysis by Cohan, Chavira, Shipon-Blum, Hitchcock, Roesch and Stein (2008), revealed that children with selective mutism include a group identified as anxious-communication delayed in addition to those exclusively anxious. This seminar incorporates an innovative and validated assessment approach (Klein, Armstrong & Shipon-Blum, 2013) that includes the assistance of parents to help us learn about children's speech, voicing and receptive/expressive language, essential to proper treatment planning as the disorder has more to do with communication and voicing than previously thought. The relationship between mutism and neck-laryngeal tension (Ruiz & Klein, 2014), and the role such tension may play in the children's difficulty initiating vocalization for speech will be discussed, as will other specific treatment suggestions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the critical role of speech-language pathologists in the management of children with SM.
  • Describe methods for evaluating speech-language and vocal control in children with SM.
  • Describe effective therapeutic techniques used to treat speech-language and vocal control in children with SM.

 

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Seminar 6 - Service Learning: The Best We Have to Offer

LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP; Susan Dillmuth-Miller, AuD, CCC-A; Rachel Wolf, PhD, CCC-SLP; Cassandra Hess, BS; Danielle Farrand, BS; Tyler Lawson, BS, from East Stroudsburg University

Service-learning is a pedagogical approach that combines academic goals with service to the community. It requires the inclusion of learning objectives, a community partnership and reflection. The benefits of service-learning for students are significant. Students gain confidence, poise and strengthen communication skills. They increase their ability to recall key knowledge and demonstrate greater depth of understanding. Additionally, service-learning experiences have been shown to develop the basic skills sought after by employers. Service-learning can take many forms. It can be completed in groups, by a whole class or individually. Students may participate in direct or indirect service learning projects. Successful service learning projects maintain academic rigor, incorporate specific learning goals and utilize reflective activities to synthesize the experience. Service learning projects can be utilized in undergraduate and graduate course work and as part of clinical practicums. They can be required within the course syllabi or offered for extra credit. This seminar will review the benefits, best practices, provide examples of projects and present student reflections. It will encourage discussion among the attendees from the student, faculty and community partner perspective. It will encourage creative exploration for the incorporation of service-learning into courses and clinicals and discuss the steps required for developing successful service learning projects. Presenters will discuss the selection of community partners and the challenges of meeting community partners’ needs and expectations. Presenters will demonstrate that service learning is a win-win for students, faculty and the community.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the essential components of service learning.
  • Explain at least two benefits of service learning to the community and students.
  • Generate one idea for a service learning project.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 7 - Tools and Strategies for Designing an AAC Therapy Camp Program

Joan Bruno, PhD, CCC-SLP, Communication Technology Resources

Camps provide an intensive, creative and motivating venue for improving the communication skills of children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices. While not all speech-language pathologists (SLPs) will have the opportunity to be a part of an AAC camp, all SLPs can develop creative and motivating intervention programs for their students using AAC devices. The first segment of the seminar will address administrative aspects of organizing an AAC Camp. Operational considerations (e.g., contracts, insurance and budget) will be highlighted and issues surrounding the program format (i.e., day camp versus overnight program, family versus camper) will be discussed. The second segment of the seminar will focus on designing an effective AAC intervention program. This will include a discussion of three key intervention components: the need to establish appropriate intervention goals based upon the augmented communicator's age and language abilities, selecting and organizing a vocabulary set appropriately matched to the user's language abilities and communication goals and integrating use of the AAC system in functional and meaningful activities. The design of each year's Camp program focuses on facilitating each camper's mastery of core vocabulary and facilitating initiated use of the individual's AAC device under the umbrella of a unique and motivating theme. The process used to develop the core and fringe vocabularies will be shared. Examples of lesson plans, organizational charts and camp activities will be provided. Suggestions for how some of these activities can be modified and used by school-based SLPs within a school or community-based intervention program will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least three administrative aspects of organizing an AAC Camp.
  • Identify three key intervention components of an AAC intervention program.
  • Identify at least three creative themes that can be used within a camp or thematic intervention program.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 8 - Voice: Modern Assessment and Management for the Medical SLP, Part 1 - WITHDRAWN

10:00 am - 11:30 am

Seminar 9 - AAC Considerations for Promoting Language Development and Classroom Participation, Part 1

Joan Bruno, PhD, CCC-SLP, Communication Technology Resources

This seminar will assist school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in providing effective augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) solutions including use of Tangible Symbol Systems, Picture Exchange (PECS), iPads with AAC Apps and speech generating devices. The availability of AAC Apps for the iPad resulted in a radical change in how many severely speech-impaired students gain access to AAC. Some districts may provide a student with an iPad and AAC App without first providing an AAC evaluation delineating the student's needs and abilities. Some parents utilize that same approach to provide their children with an AAC tool. No evidenced-based assessment of the student's symbolic or language abilities is performed. Other districts may require the school-based SLP to perform an AAC assessment without regard for the SLP's ability to complete such a task. In this seminar, key components of an AAC assessment will be reviewed. Two AAC assessment tools will be discussed: the Communication Matrix, designed to evaluate the expressive communication skills of children with severe and multiple disabilities, and the Test of Aided-Communication Symbol Performance (TASP), designed to asses four areas of symbolic performance. The benefits of a Tangible Symbol System for students with severe symbolic limitations will be presented. Examples will be provided to demonstrate how these assessments are used to match a student's abilities to the appropriate AAC App and how several popular AAC Apps lend themselves to supporting individualized education plan (IEP) goals for syntactic and pragmatic development, classroom participation and demonstrating mastery of core curriculum competencies.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least three critical components of an AAC assessment.
  • Identify at least two AAC assessment tools.
  • Identify the primary diagnostic criteria for recommending use of a Tangible Symbol System.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 10 - Graduate School Application Process

Ralph Belsterling, AuD, CCC-A/SLP, California University of Pennsylvania

This seminar will focus specifically on questions related to how, when and where to apply to graduate school. Graduate school looms ahead for many undergraduate students. This time of transition brings about many questions, including what school is right for me, when do I apply, what do I need to submit with my application, what happens if I do not get accepted and should I pursue speech-language pathology or audiology. All of these questions and more, will be discussed during this seminar.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify a listing of accredited graduate speech-language pathology and audiology programs.
  • List common graduate admission requirements.
  • List alternative options if graduate school admission is not obtained.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 11 - Mindfulness 101: Experiencing Your Mind and the Neurology Behind It

Jaime Michise, MS, CCC-SLP, University of North Texas/Private Practice; Scott Palasik, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Akron

Recently, the field of communication disorders has begun incorporating mindfulness into therapy with clients (Boyle, 2011; Michise & Palasik, 2017; Plexico & Sandage, 2011; Palasik & Michise, 2013). By learning to be more present, clients can create space needed to increase their awareness of the physical and psychological behaviors of their communication disorder. In the field of neuroscience, research has shown that mindfulness approaches are physically changing the structures and chemistry of the brain (Cunningham & Kirkland, 2014; HĂzel et al., 2011; Kross et. al., 2014; Roberts-Wolfe, 2012). This line of research provides support for continued training in mindfulness practices and the impact on people with communication disorders. During this seminar, presenters will guide attendees through an assortment of mindfulness exercises meant to help them connect with the present moment. Additionally, presenters will provide functional activities related to mindfulness that participants can use to complement their current clinical practices with people who stutter or individuals with other communication disorders. All individual and small group activities will be followed by large group debriefings/discussions, so that participants can ask questions and learn from each other. Presenters will also summarize some of the current neurological research that exists as it is related to Mindfulness and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) practices.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define mindfulness.
  • Summarize one current finding regarding the ways in which mindfulness physically changes the brain.
  • Describe three ways to implement mindfulness into therapy sessions with people who have communication disorders.

 

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 12 - Sudden Onset Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Audiologist and Patient Perspectives

Susan Dillmuth-Miller, AuD, CCC-A; Elaine Shuey, PhD, CCC-SLP, from East Stroudsburg University

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is a rapid loss of hearing which occurs typically over several days. SSHL affects one in 5,000 people annually (NIDCD, 2017) and most likely will result in a unilateral hearing loss. Accompanying dizziness and tinnitus is common. Many individuals are unaware that SSHL is considered to be a medical emergency and will assume the loss is due to a temporary problem such as an ear infection; however, if treatment is not provided immediately, the chances of recovering a significant amount of hearing is greatly reduced. The first presenter, an audiologist, will discuss diagnosis, treatment and auditory manifestations. The second presenter, a speech-language pathologist, will relay her personal experience with SSHL from discovery, diagnosis to treatment. She will discuss her personal observations relating to listening difficulties and socio-emotional concerns.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the audiological characteristics and behavioral sequelae of SSHL.
  • List three areas/abilities that can be impacted by SSHL other than auditory impact.
  • Identify the medical and therapeutic treatment protocol for SSHL.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 13 - Triadic Collaboration in a Preschool Classroom to Support Inclusive Practice

Michael Brink, MEd, Early Intervention Technical Assistance; Juliann Woods, PhD, CCC-SLP, Florida State University

Research shows the importance of inclusive environments for social and communication skill development, however, there are often challenges with logistical and instructional implementation in preschool classrooms. Providing meaningful and enriching communication experiences for all young children within their everyday environments involves thoughtful planning, partnerships and a common set of intervention practices that can be implemented with fidelity. A triadic model of intervention emphasizes the speech-language pathologist (SLP) supporting the adults who spend more time with the child, in many cases, the early childhood teacher and the parent. Two strategies that can be helpful to the triad are the use of high leverage instructional practices and the use of common planning and communication tools such as activity matrices. High leverage instructional practices include universal interventions that are evidence-based and have been shown to be implemented with fidelity by all members of the triad - the SLP, teacher and parent. Interventions such as using choices, wait time, cloze sentences and visual schedules that are appropriate for all children can be differentiated for the child with a communication delay. The triad identifies logical and appropriate opportunities for the child to practice and learn targeted communication skills during routine, planned and child-initiated activities. The use of common communication tools such as activity matrices to specify how many embedded learning opportunities on which learning targets are planned within and across classroom activities or routines. They indicate when, where and with whom embedded learning opportunities are provided and which intentional teaching strategies will be used.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify commonly used and evidence-based instructional strategies to support language development in an inclusive preschool environment by the team.
  • Develop and implement a goal and activity matrix to support communication and embedded intervention used throughout the day.
  • Identify components of a triadic support approach to intervention.

 

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 14 - Voice: Modern Assessment and Management for the Medical SLP, Part 2 - WITHDRAWN

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Seminar 15 - AAC Considerations for Promoting Language Development and Classroom Participation, Part 2

Joan Bruno, PhD, CCC-SLP, Communication Technology Resources

To establish an effective intervention program for speech and language impaired students, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need to have a strong background in language development and disorders and demonstrate competency in both assessment and intervention. This same skill set applies to SLPs assigned with the responsibility of designing an intervention plan for students requiring augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Many school-based therapists struggle when they need to translate their knowledge of assessment, language development and language disorders to students who are unable to speak. This seminar begins with a review of normal language development. Aspects of lexical, grammatical and pragmatic acquisition will be highlighted. Participants will re-visit these same developmental milestones with the focus on aided language acquisition. Issues relevant to vocabulary selection and organization will be addressed from a developmental perspective. While understanding development is critical, so too is the ability to assess the receptive and expressive language performance of severely speech-impaired individuals. Assessment is needed to benchmark progress and to guide AAC intervention goals and activities. Test measures such as the PPVT, TACL, PLS and TOLD will be reviewed. They will be discussed in terms of their use with children dependent upon AAC. Procedures for adapting these measures for use by physically impaired children will be presented. Case studies of augmented communicators demonstrating language delays and language disorders will be highlighted. Key topics discussed will include syntactical development, morphological acquisition and the need to use our knowledge of disordered language in speaking children to guide our intervention with users of AAC systems.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Apply their knowledge of language development and assessment to name at least two appropriate aided language goals for pre-symbolic students.
  • Identify language tests/procedures that can be used to assess the cognitive-language performance of users of AAC systems.
  • Identify at least two variables associated with setting AAC language goals for children using AAC.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 16 - Clinician-Friendly Discourse Assessment for Aphasia

Mary Boyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, Montclair State University

Despite calls to assess and treat communication beyond single-word and single-sentence levels, speech-language pathologists face barriers when they try to assess their clients' discourse production. Among the obstacles to this enterprise are the lack of consensus by researchers about which discourse variables to assess and clinician reports that they lack time, tools, skills and confidence to assess language at this level. While it is true that many of the assessments reported in the research literature are time-consuming and complex, there are some approaches to discourse assessment that can be considered clinician-friendly. This seminar reviews the rationale for assessing and treating aphasia at the discourse level and describes discourse assessment methods that can be done without transcription, making them possible options in a clinical setting. The steps for completing each non-transcription-based method will be explained, along with their relationship to treatment goals for individuals with aphasia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for assessing at the discourse level.
  • Connect a clinician-friendly discourse assessment method to a treatment goal.
  • Describe the steps for completing one clinician-friendly discourse assessment approach.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 17 - How Can I Use the Language and Literacy Pyramid?

Juliann Woods, PhD, CCC-SLP, Florida State University; Michael Brink, MEd, Early Intervention Technical Assistance

Are you looking for some language and literacy resources that are ready to use, address a variety of child needs and can be used in multiple settings? OCDEL has developed a multi-tiered system of support for early language and literacy. Join us to learn about the framework and explore the online universal activities that you can use during your therapy sessions and share with families. Early language and literacy development begins in infancy and continues through the toddler and preschool years. A multi-tiered system of support uses high-quality instruction, regular progress monitoring and data informed decisions to better match children's learning needs with appropriate supports. OCDEL's multi-tiered system of support for language and literacy introduces the core content necessary for future reading and writing success. It reflects the importance of a solid foundation, as well as information related to more targeted and intensive supports necessary for some young learners. The core content upon which this framework has been developed includes expressive language and communication, phonological awareness, print awareness/concepts and alphabet awareness and comprehension of written and spoken language. These four areas are consistent throughout each tier of the framework. Strategies with the strongest evidence base are aligned with each of these core content areas at each tier. An online, interactive model provides a definition of each area and an innovative way to explore all of this content..

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the use of meaningful strategies that support communication development in young children.
  • Explore ways to embed language and literacy activities into everyday routines in both home and early learning centers.
  • Identify core content that reflects predictors of successful reading by third grade.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 18 - Taking the Pulse of Health Care: New Rules, Evolving Practice

Joanne Wisely, MA, CCC-SLP, FNAP, Genesis Rehab Services

Regardless of the setting serviced by the speech-language pathologist or audiologist, health care reform impacts access to care, professional service patterns and provider payment. Within government funded health care, there have never been more changes to service models and payment structures than those currently experienced under government mandated and funded programs. When these are paired with the assorted private insurance plans and managed care programs, the volume of requirements and service criteria often become overwhelming to the professional clinician. The volume of new rules finds today's professional in an environment of constantly changing practice models and payment systems. Developed in collaboration with the ASHA StAMP Network, this seminar addresses the overall status of our health care system and how today's professional can best function within these new parameters. Suggestions are shared to address the increasing challenges presented by the health care reform movement, its impact on care delivery, the essentials of inter-professional practice and the clinical complexities of population health management. Several alternative payment systems are discussed relative to established and pending legislation, current and proposed regulations as well as the assorted medical documentation and provider payment requirements. Considerations to stimulate a valued treatment experience are shared and the importance of care planning that incorporates measurable functional outcomes is discussed. Several statutory, private and ASHA resources are provided and time within the seminar is allocated for participants to voice and discuss additional needs and education from the ASHA StAMP Network.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the components of the CMS Triple Aim and federal quality care projects.
  • Discuss varying types of health care programs and respective provider requirements.
  • Describe professional and payer resources to facilitate quality care, measurable goals and functional outcomes.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 19 - Treating Selective Mutism as a Speech-Language Pathologist

Emily Doll, MS, CCC-SLP, Colonial Intermediate Unit 20

Selective mutism (SM) is an anxiety-based childhood disorder that prevents a child from speaking in specific situations (i.e., school, public or to anyone outside the immediate family). SM is currently thought to be the result of genetic, temperamental, environmental and neurodevelopmental factors. Children with SM are at significant disadvantage compared to peers in terms of social and academic functioning. SM prevents the child from engaging in meaningful conversational exchanges with adults and peers, and thus, from learning vital social norms and skills, as well as vocabulary and language structure. Academically, children experience limited or even nonexistent social interactions with peers and teachers, leading to limited involvement in school routines and activities and even delays in oral reading and word attack skills. SM clearly affects social/pragmatic language skills and falls under the scope of practice of a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Because SLPs are well-versed in components of language development and complexity, as well as treatment methods for teaching social language skills and functional communication, SLPs bring a wealth of relevant knowledge to the table and have much to contribute to the treatment of SM. As such, it is vital that SLPs have a working understanding of how to treat SM in an intentional and evidence-based manner. This seminar will discuss characteristics of SM, review the role of the SLP, provide assessment strategies, review important factors to consider in planning treatment and provide practical activities to use in therapy sessions.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe characteristics of SM and the SLP's role in assessing and treating selective mutism.
  • Plan and carry out an effective assessment protocol to determine the student's strengths and areas of need.
  • Create and implement an intentional and evidence-based treatment program tailored to the student's individual needs.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 20 - Values-Based Living: Determining What Matters to Us and Our Clients

Jaime Michise, MS, CCC-SLP, University of North Texas/Private Practice; Scott Palasik, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Akron

What are values? What roles do they play in your life? What roles do they play in the lives of your clients? What ways can our values shape who we are as a person and communicator? This seminar will explore the concept of values - what matters most to each of us. By developing a better understanding of our values and their impact on the way we think, communicate and act, we can better assist our clients and their families in defining what matters most to them inside and outside of the therapy room. At times, our clients may discover that they are not living their lives according to their values. Perhaps their communication disorder or perceived listener judgements are holding them back. Through a joint effort in defining what matters, clinicians can assist their clients in exploring these discrepancies and creating committed actions (measurable goals) to work toward in therapy and in life. During this experiential training, presenters will guide attendees through exercises meant to help them connect with their individual values and the roles those values play in their lives; and, to create measurable goals driven by those values. Additionally, presenters will provide functional activities related to values and goal setting that participants can use to complement their current clinical practices with people who stutter or individuals with other communication disorders. All individual and small group activities will be followed by large group debriefings/discussions, so participants can ask questions and learn from each other.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define the term values-based living.
  • List five of his/her own values.
  • Describe three ways to implement values and committed actions into therapy sessions with people who have communication disorders.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Seminar 21 - Beyond Requesting: AAC and ASD for the SLP

Rachel Madel, MA, CCC-SLP, Rachel Madel Speech Therapy Inc.

This seminar will begin by giving a brief overview of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) options for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who are both verbal and non-verbal. Attendees will then learn how to select appropriate vocabulary and begin implementing simple low-tech AAC options that will transition students seamlessly to high-tech speech-generating devices. Clinicians will also learn the top ten "Cardinal Rules" to AAC implementation that help encourage ASD clients to expand language beyond single words and beyond requesting.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify various AAC options ranging from no tech, low-tech to high-tech and determine the best starting place.
  • Describe the top 10 "Cardinal Rules" to AAC implementation.
  • Identify potential challenges specific to ASD learners using AAC and discuss potential solutions.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 22 - Improved Patient Care Through Lawsuit Protection/Prevention

Larry Oxenham, American Society for Asset Protection

This seminar teaches proven and effective strategies to prevent and protect against lawsuits, allowing audiologists the peace of mind necessary to focus on improved patient care. You will learn lawsuit protection strategies most advisors are unaware of.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe maintaining focus on improved patient care rather than lawsuit defense.
  • Identify structuring practice for lawsuit protection and prevention.
  • Discuss reducing liability insurance costs and minimizing taxes.

(Instructional Level: Advanced)

Seminar 23 - Integrating Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study Results Into Clinical Treatment

Elizabeth Thrush, MS, CCC-SLP, Tower Health - Reading Hospital

Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) provide valuable information regarding anatomy and physiology of swallowing. VFSS results can be essential for planning and implementing appropriate treatment for swallowing dysfunction. However, viewing VFSS results in isolation without taking patient history and other factors into account can lead to inappropriate management decisions. This seminar examines the role of VFSS in the comprehensive evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders, including indications for VFSS, potential limitations, integrating VFSS results with observations from clinical swallowing assessments and applying VFSS results when determining risks and benefits of possible treatment options. Multiple case studies provide insight into incorporating VFSS results in the management of complex patients and clinical scenarios.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List five indications for VFSS.
  • Describe four factors to consider when determining optimal timing for VFSS.
  • Discuss the importance of integrating VFSS results with clinical observations and patient history.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 24 - Let it Go, Let it Go: Experiencing Thought Defusion

Scott Palasik, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Akron; Jaime Michise, MS, CCC-SLP, University of North Texas/Private Practice

Where do thoughts come from? What power do we give our thoughts? What impact can these thoughts have on our daily lives and the lives of our clients? This seminar will explore the concept of thought fusion - the natural and automatic tendency to cling to our thoughts. By developing a better understanding of the power we give our thoughts and the language we use when talking with ourselves and others, we can learn to create space between ourselves and our thoughts, thus reducing their power. Clinicians can assist clients who stutter, or those with other communication disorders, with learning to create space between themselves and their thoughts by teaching them to explore their thoughts in a more objective fashion. By creating space, our clients can also develop the willingness to accept all thoughts and emotions that may arise in a given moment without judging or clinging to them. This may allow themselves to see an array of options and increase psychological flexibility (the ability to create choices in thoughts and behaviors). During this experiential training, presenters will guide attendees through exercises meant to observe their thoughts and the language they use that can influence emotions and physical reactions. Additionally, presenters will provide functional activities related to thought defusion that participants can use to complement their current clinical practices. All individual and small group activities will be followed by large group debriefings/discussions, so that participants can ask questions and learn from each other.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define the term thought fusion.
  • List five prison words.
  • Describe three ways to implement thought defusion activities into therapy sessions with people who have communication disorders.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 25 - Multi-Level Treatment Approaches for Aphasia

Mary Boyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, Montclair State University

Discourse production is a frequent communicative activity in everyday life and it is a valued outcome for people with aphasia. Despite these facts, most therapy focuses on single-word or single-sentence levels of language. There is, however, emerging evidence for multi-level treatment approaches for aphasia. These treatments systematically integrate work at the word, sentence and discourse levels. This seminar reviews four such approaches: Interactive Storytelling Therapy, Linguistic Underpinnings of Narratives in Aphasia (LUNA), Narrative Intervention in Aphasia (NARNIA) and Integrated Discourse Treatment for Aphasia (IDTA). Each treatment approach is described and evidence of its efficacy is reviewed. Discussion includes adapting the research protocols for non-research clinical settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Outline the rationale for multi-level approaches to treating aphasia.
  • Describe the steps for one multi-level treatment approach for aphasia.
  • Discuss similarities and differences among four multi-level treatment approaches for aphasia.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 26 - PA Licensure Update

Amy Goldman, MS, CCC-SLP, Board of Examiners in Speech-Language and Audiology

Members of the Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology will present information related to the PA Licensure Act and current regulations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define continuing education requirements for PA licensure as contrasted with requirements for ASHA and PDE.
  • Describe the limitations on the Board regarding issuance of opinions.
  • Identify one national trend regarding regulation of practice in speech-language pathology and audiology.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Seminar 27 - How to Find and Implement Free and Low-Cost EBP

Jill Shook, MS, CCC-SLP, Jill Shook Therapy LLC

This seminar provides information for speech-language pathologists and audiologists on using free and low-cost methods to find and implement evidence-based practice. It will provide a summary of the "research to practice gap" (why current research isn't being shared with current practicing clinicians) as well as practical solutions to find and implement evidence-based interventions in your practice. A guided walkthrough of accessing many of the included databases and other resources will be included, as well as a brainstorming time for participants to develop a plan for accessing and implementing research in their current jobs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three barriers to evidence-based practice in their field.
  • Describe three different free and/or paid resources for accessing EBP.
  • Create a plan for accessing EBP for themselves individually and/or for their organization.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 28 - Social Language Training Within School-Based Collaborative Approaches

Rosslyn Delmonico, MA, CCC-SLP, Bubba & Munch Speech Language Services

This seminar explores five steps for successful collaboration within school settings. It provides an applied example in the area of social communication and discusses the impact that statistical knowledge can have on our collaborative efforts. Information is powerful; particularly when it moves us to care. When we care, we can then inspire others to care (i.e., educators, parents). Statistical information on social-emotional and mental health concerns for Gen Z and Alpha children is presented and provides key questions to assess our own competencies. Through self-reflection, we acknowledge personal strengths and target weaknesses so that we can then, regardless of the model being implemented, provide optimal professional support to others. This seminar provides examples of collaborative models within the framework of the multi-tiered systems of support. It summarizes theoretical learning perspectives and provides concepts to consider within social-language instruction for the development of perspective taking and empathy. The value of sharing professional stories will be discussed and two collaborative stories that resulted in social communication skills being targeted within school communities will be described. The research that emerged from these collaborations is presented and considers strategic planning for advocacy at all levels of implementation. It highlights how social-language instruction benefits children across grade levels and curriculum. The objective is to have participants leave this seminar inspired by ideas and strategies to incorporate into their collaborative models; specifically in the area of social communication.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and list ways that social language instruction can impact a child's social-emotional wellness and how it can integrate and enhance academic learning outcomes across grade levels and curriculum.
  • List ways that a speech-language pathologist can strategically plan and implement a series of five steps for increasing awareness and advocacy for social-emotional wellness within schools, home and community.
  • Identify and list practical strategies (i.e., Powerpoint presentations, e-blasts, story sharing) and hands-on tools (i.e., craft projects) for enhancing social-emotional wellness within schools, home and community.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 29 - Starting a Private Practice and Making It Work

Susan DeMilia, MA, CCC-SLP; Amy Lustig, PhD, MPH, CCC-SLP, from Salus University

This is an overview of the skills and strategies that are important to planning, starting and maintaining a viable private speech-language pathology practice. Not all practices are the same nor should they be. This seminar will focus on two different practices-one primarily adult and one primarily pediatric. Attendees will take away practical advice for deciding if a private practice is for you and how you might get started.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify five or more specific areas of development for starting a private practice.
  • Identify three clinical skills and three management skills needed to operate an SLP practice.
  • Demonstrate where to look for support with business and supervisory questions related to starting an SLP private practice.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 30 - The Business of Telepractic

Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP, eLiveNow

As telepractice continues to grow, more clinicians are looking into adding telepractice to their repertoire. Whether it is contracting independently, or adding it as a service to your private practice, it is important to understand how telepractice works, the similarities and differences compared to in-person services and how to market it successfully. This seminar will explore what clinicians need to know before diving into telepractice, how to obtain the training that will assist them in being a highly qualified, ethical service provider and how to market to school districts. Gaining an understanding of questions needed to be asked, determining whether telepractice is a good fit for both clinician and school district, and understanding the market, will lead to greater comfort when making the leap into telepractice. It will assist in providing high quality, ethical services that meet the needs of clients in difficult to serve areas and those with specialized needs.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three necessary components for high-quality telepractice.
  • Describe three similarities/differences between telepractice and in-person services.
  • Describe one marketing technique to acquire school district clients.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 31 - University Forum

Mary Beth Mason, PhD, CCC-SLP, Edinboro University; Robert Serianni, MS, CCC-SLP, Salus University

Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (PSHA) University Forum invites members of undergraduate and graduate programs, department chairs, program and clinical directors, teaching faculty and clinical supervisors, to share their collective knowledge and skills in a guided discussion, to enhance the didactic and clinical education of all students in programs of communication sciences and disorders throughout the Commonwealth. Topics to be addressed include interprofessional education, clinical supervision, reimbursement and legislation changes, teaching strategies and accreditation and administrative challenges and successes. Moderated by members of the PSHA Executive Board, aims of this seminar are to spark conversations and foster collaborations, to facilitate the growth of higher education in communication sciences and disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify strategies for infusing didactic and clinical education in communication sciences and disorders programs.
  • Illustrate successful integration of interprofessional education into communication sciences and disorders programs.
  • Develop approaches to address administrative and legislative changes in higher education that impact communication sciences and disorders programs.

(Instructional Level: Introductory))

Seminar 32 - Working With Interpreters During Assessment

Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

The United States is becoming increasingly linguistically diverse. Because of this and the subsequent shortage of bilingual speech-language pathologists, the inclusion of interpreters in the speech and language assessment process has become an increasingly common practice. Federal laws (e.g., P.L. 108-446) mandate that clients be assessed in their native language. However, the assessment results must also reflect the client's linguistic abilities. To accomplish this, the speech-language pathologist and interpreter must work together as a team. This requires the speech-language pathologist to learn about the role of interpreters and the client's culture and native language. The purpose of this seminar will be to provide a starting point for speech-language pathologists to achieve these two aims. The speech-language pathologist must develop an understanding of the role and background of interpreters. Interpreters' backgrounds vary widely. Not all have been trained to work in health care settings, so the clinician must provide the appropriate amount of debriefing before the assessment. The interpreter may provide information to the speech-language pathologist prior to the assessment. They can evaluate items regarding whether they are culturally appropriate for a given client. They can also assist in gathering data in a way that facilitates an understanding among the assessment team, the client and their family. Speech-language pathologists should also become informed about the client's native language and culture. It is important that the speech-language pathologist understand issues related to bilingualism and second language acquisition.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of interpreters as team members in the assessment process.
  • Discuss the information that should be provided to interpreters prior to assessment.
  • Describe how speech-language pathologists might inform themselves to increase the validity of the assessment.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Friday, April 12

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Seminar 33 - AAC Conundrum: How Do I Test That?

Skye Lewis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Francis Marion University

Whether a clinician is asked to evaluate a child or adult with a high- or low-incidence disability or disease process, there are often questions concerning how to effectively use standardized and nonstandardized assessment measures during the evaluation process. This seminar will review the necessary components of a general augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) evaluation and then explore the additional considerations one might consider during evaluation of various populations. Evidence-based practice, practice-based evidence and client/caregiver perspectives will be integrated during this seminar.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the components of an AAC evaluation.
  • Associate assessment information with a particular standardized assessment.
  • Formulate a diagnostic plan for individuals from various high- and low-incidence populations.
  • (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 34 -Clinician Thinking Outside the Box: Engaging Clients of All Ages

Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Jason Curtis; Cara Imbalzano; Ann Roman, MS, CCC-SLP, from Misericordia University

Engagement is defined as the ability to be greatly interested or involved in an activity. Individuals with neurological disorders often present with cognitive deficits in attention which cause reduced engagement with the world around them. This can provide significant barriers to treatment using traditional strategies for language, cognition, pragmatics or other modalities of communication impaired by their disorder. This seminar will focus on innovative ideas for keeping clients motivated and engaged in the therapeutic process. The concept of innovation from the perspectives of the clinical supervisor and student clinician will be discussed. Similarities between approaches to engagement regardless of diagnosis of age will be discussed. Case illustrations will be included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define engagement related to speech-language treatment.
  • Identify one clinical supervisor perspective of innovative treatment.
  • Identify one idea for keeping clients motivated and engaged.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 35 - Early Exposure to Visual Language for Children Who are Deaf

Cassandra Lucas-Szumigala, MS, CCC-SLP, Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf

Research suggests that children are already being exposed to language in utero. When they are born, they begin acquiring language within seconds of meeting their parents. That is, unless they are deaf or hard of hearing. If these children are among the more than 90 percent who are born to hearing parents, they don't begin acquiring language until it is accessible to them. When that occurs is completely up to the adults in his/her life. This seminar will review current research investigating the impact of linguistic deprivation on the cognitive, social-emotional and literacy development of children ages birth to five who are deaf or hard of hearing. It will discuss Deafness from a socio-cultural perspective and outline the benefits of ASL/English bilingual educational approaches beginning in early intervention. You will leave this seminar with a stronger understanding of the impact of language deprivation in the deaf/hard of hearing population, and how, as a professional, you can be part of promoting change and growth for our next generation. Let's flip the script and be part of the solution!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the critical window for language acquisition.
  • List risks related to language deprivation.
  • List benefits of a visual language.
  • Provide a solution for the epidemic of language deprivation among deaf/hh children.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 36 - Neurophysiology of Speech Perception, Part 1

Bharath Chandrasekaran, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

This presentation will outline the neurobiological computations that underlie speech perception using an interdisciplinary, computational and lifespan approach. A primary goal of this presentation is to understand the brain mechanisms underlying how speech signals are transformed into behaviorally relevant (linguistic) constructs. I will provide an overview of the contemporary and emerging methodology used to study the neurophysiology of speech processing. I will elucidate the crucial role of cortical-subcortical networks in the extraction, encoding, categorization, learning and experience-dependent modulation of speech signals. Additionally, I will discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of speech signals in noisy environments. I will conclude the presentation with practical examples of how a better understanding of the neurobiology of cortical-subcortical networks can be leveraged to design optimal behavioral and neuro-modulation interventions to enhance speech processing and reduce individual differences in speech perception.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the acoustical properties of the speech signals and talk about how these properties are encoded by the brain.
  • Describe the latest neuroscience methods used to study speech perception.
  • Discuss the impact of language, music and training experiences on the neurophysiology of speech perception.
  • Understand how the brain processes speech signals in challenging listening environments.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 37 - What Every School-Based SLP Needs to Know

Elizabeth Christopher, MS, CCC-SLP, PaTTAN; Tammy Thompson-Cooke, MS, CCC-SLP, PaTTAN; Jennifer Geibel, MS, CCC-SLP, PaTTAN

School-based practice is highly complex and requires a breadth and breath of knowledge that can be overwhelming to keep up on the most current information. This seminar will provide the top five updates based on the most frequently asked questions (FAQ) to the PaTTAN Speech Language team from practioners across Pennsylvania. We will be discussing the FAQs regarding the type of certificates for speech-language pathologists to work in the schools, service delivery models, Medicaid billing and interpreting information from online sources.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define the two types of PDE issued educational certificates.
  • Compare and contrast the two certifications.
  • Identify four different service delivery options.
  • Define best practices for interpreting information from outside sources.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

8:30 am - 12:00 pm

Short Course 1 - Semantic Feature Analysis: From Naming to Discourse and Beyond

Craig Coleman, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Mary Weidner, PhD, CCC-SLP, from Marshall University

Mary Boyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, Montclair State University

Word retrieval impairment is a pervasive and frustrating problem for people with acquired aphasia. Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA) treatment is widely used to treat word retrieval problems in this population. Its outcomes have been investigated in different languages and by different research teams around the world. Most clinicians use SFA in confrontation-naming tasks, but it has also been used to target word-retrieval in discourse. This short course briefly reviews current theories of word retrieval, including how memory interacts with language processes, and provides the theoretical framework for SFA treatment. It describes how word-retrieval impairments manifest in discourse and disrupt discourse production, using videotapes of people with aphasia to illustrate these problems. The treatment protocols at the single-word and discourse levels are reviewed and are illustrated using videotapes of people with aphasia participating in treatment. The short course examines evidence of the efficacy of SFA treatment at the confrontation-naming and discourse levels. Challenges of working in a discourse context are discussed, and practical suggestions for adapting resources and methods described in research studies to non-research clinical settings are provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current theory of word retrieval.
  • Describe the treatment steps for SFA at the confrontation-naming and discourse levels.
  • Describe ways to adapt SFA research protocols for use in clinical settings.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Seminar 38 - Empowering Families to Facilitate Language Development With Their Deaf Child

Cassandra Lucas-Szumigala, MS, CCC-SLP, Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf

More than 90 percent of deaf/hard of hearing babies are born to hearing parents. These children are at high risk for significant developmental delays without the proper early intervention. That's where we come in. You don't have to be an expert in all things hearing loss or fluent in American Sign Language to be helpful to these families. If you work in EI and you don't know what to do when you have a deaf or hard of hearing child on your caseload, this seminar is for you. Specific strategies and activities will be shared that can be immediately applied when you go back to work on Monday.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and explain strategies and approaches with parents in a non-biased way.
  • List appropriate resources for parents and coach them on how to apply them in their daily routines in easily digestible ways.
  • Involve parents in family language planning.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Session includes 30-minute break

Seminar 39 - A Primer in Phonetics

Nancy Carlino, MA, CCC-SLP, California University of PA

Speech-language pathologists often need to complete a careful phonetic transcription for clients with speech sound disorders, but they are not always confident in their phonetic knowledge and skills. This course is a primer in phonetics that is designed to increase practical knowledge and skills to promote effective diagnosis and treatment of individuals with speech sound disorders. This seminar will review and apply the basic skills of phonetics, including classifying consonants and vowels, identifying primary and secondary stress in words, marking suprasegmentals and diacritics and transcribing typical speech, atypical speech and dialects using phonetic symbols and diacritics.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Classify consonants in American English by place, manner and voicing characteristics and classify vowels in American English by tongue height, tongue advancement, muscle tenseness and roundedness.
  • List examples of lexical, grammatical and contrastive stress, and mark the syllables in words that carry the primary and secondary stress.
  • Explain the practical use of common diacritics and write their markings.
  • Phonetically transcribe correct, incorrect and dialectically modified productions of words.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 40 - Implementing Behavior Strategies to Facilitate Successful AAC Use

Joy McGowan, MS, CCC-SLP; Danielle Franchini-Muir, MSEd, BCBA, from Easterseals Southeastern Pennsylvania

Speech-language pathologists are experiencing an increase in the number of children on their caseloads diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and complex communication needs. Often these children have limited verbal language and an augmentative communication (AAC) system is implemented with the expectation that these low-tech systems and speech generating devices will improve their expressive communication. This population of children can demonstrate challenging behaviors that are presumed to be related to the child’s limited communication skills. Although the child’s ability to communicate their needs appropriately can be inadequate, an AAC system may not address the underlying pragmatic language disorder the child presents. Families view the inability to communicate as the reason for their child’s behavior issues; however, when observing the child’s communication interaction it is apparent that the reason for the behavior is not simply frustration due to lack of ability to communicate. There are many reasons behaviors occur and continue to occur. All behavior communicates messages - even challenging behavior! Using a Positive Behavior Instructional Supports (PBIS) approach and evidence-based strategies focusing on prevention is an effective model to utilize for any population of children. Working collaboratively with a Behavior Specialist can help to provide the team with a plan to identify barriers to effective AAC use and how to overcome or remove them. PBIS model will be reviewed and case studies will be presented to describe evidenced-based strategies to help decrease challenging behaviors and in turn, teach appropriate replacement behaviors and functional communication utilizing the child’s AAC system.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List five factors to consider to facilitate functional use of an AAC system.
  • Describe Positive Behavior Instructional Supports and the Pyramid Model.
  • Describe how the implementation of universal supports can be prerequisites for the initiation and teaching of AAC.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 41 - Neurophysiology of Speech Perception, Part 2

Bharath Chandrasekaran, PhD, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

This presentation will outline the neurobiological computations that underlie speech perception using an interdisciplinary, computational and lifespan approach. A primary goal of this presentation is to understand the brain mechanisms underlying how speech signals are transformed into behaviorally relevant (linguistic) constructs. I will provide an overview of the contemporary and emerging methodology used to study the neurophysiology of speech processing. I will elucidate the crucial role of cortical-subcortical networks in the extraction, encoding, categorization, learning and experience-dependent modulation of speech signals. Additionally, I will discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of speech signals in noisy environments. I will conclude the presentation with practical examples of how a better understanding of the neurobiology of cortical-subcortical networks can be leveraged to design optimal behavioral and neuro-modulation interventions to enhance speech processing and reduce individual differences in speech perception.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the acoustical properties of the speech signals and talk about how these properties are encoded by the brain.
  • Describe the latest neuroscience methods used to study speech perception.
  • Discuss the impact of language, music, and training experiences on the neurophysiology of speech perception.
  • Understand how the brain processes speech signals in challenging listening environments.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 42 - Problem Based Learning: Teaching as We Practice in Speech-Language Pathology

Louise Keegan, PhD, CCC-SLP; Susana Keller, CScD, CCC-SLP; Eric Sanders, PhD, CCC-SLP; Monica Kaniamattam, PhD, from Moravian College

Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a constructivist learner-centered andragogy that emphasizes knowledge as an emergent and socially constructed relationship to information, acknowledges the value of active student participation in learning and is believed to bridge some of the issues related to the theory-practice gap in professional health care education. Since the 1970s, PBL has become an increasingly prominent approach and has been adopted in a variety of health sciences and medical school curricula (Whitehill, Bridges & Chan, 2014). A number of speech-language pathology programs in Hong Kong, Sweden, Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Canada have PBL curricula, and most recently Moravian College has adopted this approach. This presentation describes the implementation of an integrated PBL curriculum. Here, the traditional lecture based method of teaching to merely convey discipline specific knowledge and information, is replaced by an integrated curriculum based on problem cases. This process teaches students to collaboratively and actively critically analyze a situation or problem, seek out appropriate resources and create a solution (Visconti, 2010), allowing students to reflect on their experiences and seek out diverse knowledge, as well as critically analyze and evaluate information in order to decide on a solution (Savery & Duffy, 2001). Thus, using a sample case the authors will provide a comprehensive overview of the curriculum implementation process as well as a description of how knowledge and skills outcomes are met using this andragogy. The authors will also describe how the principles of this approach can be applied in any program coursework.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Compare a problem based curriculum with that of a traditional curriculum.
  • Apply problem based learning practices.
  • Critically appraise a problem based approach.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Seminar 43 - Attitudes, Accommodations and Advocacy, Oh My!

Cassandra Lucas-Szumigala, MS, CCC-SLP, Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf

When children with hearing loss transition to school, they enter a world of noise, chaos and over stimulation. Regardless of the type and severity of loss, each student with hearing loss will struggle to some extent when they go to school, be it socially, academically or both. This seminar will address the attitudes that educational professionals have regarding accommodations for children with hearing loss and how we can advocate for these students as they navigate through the next 12 years of their education. If you are an SLP, itinerant teacher for the deaf, special education teacher or administrator, you won't want to miss this interactive seminar where specific strategies and activities will be shared that you can take back to the child and IEP team. You will leave with an action plan for when you get back to work on Monday.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the most common challenges students with hearing loss face once they get to school.
  • List strategies that the IEP team (including parents, student and professionals) can implement to ensure a successful school year for the student.
  • List common accommodations and explain their significance to each teacher/classroom with whom a student with hearing loss attends.
  • Create an action plan that advocates for students with hearing loss.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 44 - Building a Successful Interprofessional Education Framework Across Health Science Disciplines

Elizabeth Grillo, PhD, CCC-SLP, Patricia Davidson, PhD, CCC-SLP, from West Chester University

Training pre-professional undergraduate and graduate students in the core competencies of interprofessional education (IPE) may influence their willingness to participate in interprofessional practice (IPP) in the future (Maharajan et al., 2017). When students have knowledge and positive perceptions about the roles and responsibilities of team members from different disciplines, they are more likely to embrace IPP, which in turn enhances patient outcomes (Barr, 2002). In 2016, the College of Health Sciences at West Chester University created an IPE task force with membership from seven disciplines within the university. The task force was charged with developing ways to educate and train undergraduate and graduate students from the seven participating disciplines about IPE. The task force created and implemented an IPE framework involving asynchronous learning, in-person team activities, case simulations and an opportunity for IPP. This seminar will provide an overview of the IPE framework, the training modalities used and pre-training and post-training survey data from student participants. Sample interactive training methods will be shared.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Interprofessional Education (IPE) framework used at West Chester University (WCU).
  • Explain the results of survey data from the students who participated in IPE at WCU.
  • Apply the IPE framework used at WCU to other training programs.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 45 - Neurophysiology of Speech Perception, Part 3

Bharath Chandrasekaran, PhD, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

This presentation will outline the neurobiological computations that underlie speech perception using an interdisciplinary, computational and lifespan approach. A primary goal of this presentation is to understand the brain mechanisms underlying how speech signals are transformed into behaviorally relevant (linguistic) constructs. I will provide an overview of the contemporary and emerging methodology used to study the neurophysiology of speech processing. I will elucidate the crucial role of cortical-subcortical networks in the extraction, encoding, categorization, learning and experience-dependent modulation of speech signals. Additionally, I will discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of speech signals in noisy environments. I will conclude the presentation with practical examples of how a better understanding of the neurobiology of cortical-subcortical networks can be leveraged to design optimal behavioral and neuro-modulation interventions to enhance speech processing and reduce individual differences in speech perception.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the acoustical properties of the speech signals and talk about how these properties are encoded by the brain.
  • Describe the latest neuroscience methods used to study speech perception.
  • Discuss the impact of language, music and training experiences on the neurophysiology of speech perception.
  • Understand how the brain processes speech signals in challenging listening environments.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 47 - Objective Review of Therapies for Agrammatism Due to Aphasia

Bruce Wisenburn, PhD, CCC-SLP; Edward Crawley, PhD, from Marywood University

This seminar is based on an ongoing meta-analysis of experimental studies of therapy for agrammatism due to aphasia. A complete recent search has found more than 50 relevant therapy studies focused on improving expressive language skills for people with agrammatism. The relevant language measures for these studies are in the areas of syntax, semantics, fluency and length of production. Step-by-step procedures for treatment approaches will be reviewed, including for Constraint Induced Language Therapy (CILT), Mapping Therapy, Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT), Movement Therapy (including Treatment of Underlying Forms, TUF and Linguistic Specific Treatment, LST), Sentence Production Program for Aphasia (SPPA; originally Helm Elicited Language Program for Syntax Stimulation, HELPSS) and verb therapy. The change in language functioning due to treatment (i.e., the effect size) has been calculated and will be listed for each relevant measure for each study.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe seven different general treatment approaches for agrammatism.
  • Identify research evidence supporting the different treatment approaches for agrammatism.
  • Identify the effect size for the different treatment approaches for agrammatism.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

1:00 pm - 4:15 pm

Short Course 2 - Add a Little SUGAR to Your Language Sampling

Robert Owens, PhD, CCC-SLP, College of St. Rose

Language sampling analysis (LSA) is an integral part of a language evaluation. This short course will discuss a new method of language sampling and analysis (SUGAR) that can be completed in approximately 30 minutes. Normative data obtained from language samples of more than 350 children, ages 3-10 years, will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Apply robust language sampling.
  • Calculate the four SUGAR metrics.
  • Identify intervention targets from a language sample.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Attendees of this short course are encouraged to bring a laptop. Necessary files will be provided prior to Convention.

Session includes 15-minute break

2:45 pm - 4:15 pm

Seminar 48 - Facilitating Early Development Using Daily Routines

Barbara Weber, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, Private Practice; Merle Crawford, Private Practice

This seminar will focus on embedding early development of skills across developmental domains: behavior regulation and social skills, cognitive and receptive language skills, expressive language skills, gross motor skills, fine motor skills and self-care/adaptive skills. The presenters will focus on review of developmental sequences within domains, coaching families in addressing IFSP/IEP goals during common routines and activities, and embedding skill development in daily routines to empower families to promote development and participation within routines and the community.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain to families how to understand their child's development and establish appropriate expectations for their child.
  • Identify how to support families in addressing IFSP/IEP goals during commonly occurring routines and activities.
  • Discuss ways to empower families to promote development and participation in family and community activities.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 49 -Neurophysiology of Speech Perception, Part 4

Bharath Chandrasekaran, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

This presentation will outline the neurobiological computations that underlie speech perception using an interdisciplinary, computational and lifespan approach. A primary goal of this presentation is to understand the brain mechanisms underlying how speech signals are transformed into behaviorally relevant (linguistic) constructs. I will provide an overview of the contemporary and emerging methodology used to study the neurophysiology of speech processing. I will elucidate the crucial role of cortical-subcortical networks in the extraction, encoding, categorization, learning and experience-dependent modulation of speech signals. Additionally, I will discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of speech signals in noisy environments. I will conclude the presentation with practical examples of how a better understanding of the neurobiology of cortical-subcortical networks can be leveraged to design optimal behavioral and neuro-modulation interventions to enhance speech processing and reduce individual differences in speech perception.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the acoustical properties of the speech signals and talk about how these properties are encoded by the brain.
  • Describe the latest neuroscience methods used to study speech perception.
  • Discuss the impact of language, music, and training experiences on the neurophysiology of speech perception.
  • Understand how the brain processes speech signals in challenging listening environments.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 50 - PROMPT Assessment and Treatment: Integrating the Cognitive-Linguistic and Social-Emotional Domains

Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, PROMPT Instructor

Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT) trained speech-language pathologists assess and treat individuals holistically by approaching communication as an interaction of the physical-sensory, cognitive-linguistic and social-emotional domain within the Conceptual Framework. PROMPT is most widely known for treating motor speech disorders and as a technique in which the clinician uses their hands to help the client's articulators move to produce a sound, word, phrase or sentence. While PROMPT can be used to improve the physical-sensory domain, the PROMPT system of evaluating and treating children incorporates all domains. PROMPT does not treat only speech production. All aspects of the child are addressed. This seminar will examine how the cognitive-linguistic and social-emotional domains are integrated from a PROMPT perspective.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe communication deficits as they relate to the Conceptual Framework.
  • Identify components of the Cognitive-Linguistic and Social-Emotional Domains.
  • Describe how PROMPT integrates the Cognitive-Linguistic and Social-Emotional Domains in assessment and treatment.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 51 - Reconsidering Swallowing: What is Normal?

Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, Accelerated Care Plus

Although the speech-language pathologists have been treating swallowing disorders for several years, until recent times an educational requirement did not exist. Even still, many university programs focus on swallowing impairment leaving the clinician with a poor understanding of "normal." This presentation will provide a brief overview of the literature concerning the kinematic and temporal parameters of normal, adult swallowing.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List the physiological processes involved in swallowing.
  • Identify temporal measures of normal swallowing.
  • Verbalize the variability of normal swallowing.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 52 - The Use of Virtual Dissection to Teach Anatomy and Physiology to Undergraduate Students

Annette Ritzko; Quinn Kelley; Maddison Stein; Jillian Scanlon; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Faculty Advisor, from Misericordia University

Anatomy and physiology education for speech-language pathology students’ needs to be engaging and hands-on to provide a solid foundation of knowledge for clinical application. In response to increasing technological advancements and to address the issues faced in education of anatomy in undergraduate speech-language pathology programs, we use state-of-the-art technology to combine classroom instruction with an interactive dissection experience to further enhance the education of our undergraduate students. The virtual dissection table includes features such as the table capture tool, pen tool and quiz mode that enable students and professors to personalize resources to be utilized in the classroom and independent study. Students can choose to view and interact with gross anatomy, high resolution regional anatomy, 2D, 3D and 4D models of CT and MRI scans and hundreds of medical pathology cases from real patients. The curriculum section of the virtual dissection table is functional for a classroom setting. The curriculum is categorized by region and system and comes with interactive pre-set views that can be found in the view sequencer menu and pre-made annotations to facilitate learning. Specific functions of the table, examples of virtual dissection applications in the classroom setting, and its positive implications to undergraduate learning will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the basic tools and controls of a virtual dissection system.
  • Discuss the benefits of virtual dissection on undergraduate speech-language pathology student education.
  • Describe specific applications of virtual dissection in the classroom setting.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Seminar 53 - Determining Client Candidacy for Telepractice

Tami Radzai, MA, CCC-SLP, PresenceLearning, Inc.

Technology has changed the way we live our lives, as well as the way we work. Video and interactive technology allow us to have conversations with family a world away, as well as video conferences, distance learning options, webinars and real-time collaboration. The medical community has embraced this technology for many years and new telehealth options are continually being offered for patients around the globe. As speech-language pathologists, we are seeing this exciting technology become a part of many of our school systems as well. Telepractice, a newer mode of service delivery that provides high quality therapy to clients, has proven to be an expanding and exciting method of delivering speech-language services to students with communication needs. Telepractice is recognized as an effective option by leading professional and medical organizations including the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the Mayo Clinic and the American Telemedicine Association. More than 40 published, peer-reviewed studies confirm that telepractice produces outcomes that are as good as, or better than, standard face-to-face therapy. This seminar will specifically focus on considerations for determining client candidacy for telepractice. According to ASHA's Telepractice Portal, there are four main areas to consider when determining client candidacy for telepractice: physical/sensory, cognitive/behavioral, communication and support services. We will review and respond to common questions and concerns in regard to each area related to candidacy. The presenter of this seminar has conducted or supervised thousands of speech-language therapy sessions via telepractice and has a passion for sharing her experience with other speech-language pathologists.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the necessary components of a high-quality telepractice service delivery model.
  • List four areas a clinician should assess when considering a client's appropriateness for telepractice.
  • Name at least one accommodation for each of the four areas that could be used to increase the quality of the telehealth services.

(Instructional Level: Introductory)

Seminar 54 - Functional Speech Disorder: The Lowdown on Psychogenic Stuttering

Skye Lewis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Francis Marion University; Melissa Scott, BA, Edinboro University

I know my client is stuttering, but is it developmental, neurogenic or psychogenic? This seminar will review the characteristics of each type of stuttering and then summarize the literature relevant to the disorder of interest. Using a case study, the seminar will explore components of a comprehensive evaluation as well as treatment options informed by the literature and assessment findings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Compare the speech characteristics of psychogenic and developmental stuttering.
  • List five components of an assessment of psychogenic stuttering.
  • Describe three recommendations appropriate for persons with psychogenic stuttering.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 55 - How Synesthesia Can Inform Us About Language Acquisition in Children and Language Recovery in Aphasia

Vijayachandra Ramachandra, PhD, Marywood University

Synesthesia is a condition in which otherwise normal individuals involuntarily experience sensation in a certain unstimulated sensory modality when some other modality is stimulated. For example, a synesthete may see the color yellow when presented with the letter K or taste cherries while hearing the word chair, such cross-modal associations are not unique to people with synesthesia; it is seen even in the neurologically normal population. A recent study conducted in our lab showed that cross-modal associations between words and shapes, tastes and shapes and taste-words and shapes were seen in neurotypicals and even in some individuals with aphasia. These associations are based on sound symbolism, which refers to a direct connection (non-arbitrary) between a form and its meaning. For instance, a nonsense word like bouba is associated with a round shape (or sweet taste) and another like kiki with an angular/spiky shape (or bitter taste). In this seminar, current evidence from literature and research will be presented to discuss how research in the field of synesthesia and sound symbolism can inform us about acquisition of words in young children and recovery of language in adults with aphasia.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the phenomenon of synesthesia and sound symbolism.
  • Discuss the role of sound symbolism in language acquisition in children.
  • Discuss the role of sound symbolism in language recovery in adults with aphasia.

(Instructional Level: Intermediate)

Seminar 56 - Motor Learning in Voice Rehabilitation

Danielle Spagnuolo, BS; Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Faculty Advisor; Brianna Spilsbury; Chantal Whiteduck; Anna Hershey, from Misericordia University

The human brain learns in many ways. Current motor learning literature supports an integration of implicit and explicit instruction to enhance and accelerate learning. In studies completed by Tellis and colleagues (2015), participants who received implicit-explicit voice instruction demonstrated changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in brain areas consistent with acquisition of motor skills as compared to control and implicit-learning training groups. Results from functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) also indicated a difference in the cortical regions of interest (ROIs) from one instructional method to another, helping to determine the brain pathways that emerge through the motor learning process. This presentation will outline and define a voice therapy protocol that utilizes these implicit-explicit principles. Videos of this approach to voice therapy and results of studies supporting this method of voice therapy will be presented.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain components of motor learning.
  • Explain how motor learning relates to voice therapy.
  • Provide clinical examples of motor learning in voice.
  • (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Seminar 57 - Private Practice Essentials: Starting and Growing Your Own Business

    Jill Shook, MS, CCC-SLP, Jill Shook Therapy LLC

    This seminar will answer your questions about starting a private practice from the ground up. It is for anyone who has ever thought that they wanted to start a private SLP practice but weren't sure where to begin, or has looked into it but gave up after drowning in the information overload! It guides you through the entire process (with a step-by-step checklist and links) of legally and simply getting a private practice off the ground (even when already employed). Topics to be covered include how to set up your business structure, how to set a fair and marketable rate, marketing essentials and HIPAA compliance. It will also include a question-and-answer time for participants to engage with the information and develop their understanding of the material.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the first five steps to legally start a private practice in Pennsylvania.
    • Describe three differences between their current setting (schools, home health, SNF or other clinic) and owning a private practice.
    • Describe two major resources for HIPAA compliance information.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Seminar 58 - Prospective Analysis of Memory Performance in Patients With Lyme Disease

    LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, CCC-SLP; Carly Gregas, from East Stroudsburg University

    Lyme disease is an inflammatory condition resulting from an infection by tick-borne bacteria called Borrelia burgdorfei. This bacterial infection can result in fevers, headache, arthritis and neurologic issues such as encephalopathy. Lyme disease patients, especially those with encephalopathy, often complain of memory impairment. Various research shows patients with Lyme disease scoring statistically lower on memory tests compared to a healthy control group. This study is a preliminary look at patient perception of memory difficulties and actual memory performance in patients with Lyme disease. Areas of concern expressed by patients and areas of concern identified in testing will be discussed. The possible impact of fatigue and pain will be addressed. Results are part of an on-going study on cognitive communication deficits in patients with rheumatic disease.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Define three different types of memory.
    • Identify the two types of memory deficits commonly found in research of Lyme disease patients.
    • Describe Lyme disease and its cognitive-linguistic symptoms.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Saturday, April 13

    8:00 am - 9:30 am

    Seminar 59 - Fluency Plus: Managing Fluency Disorders in Clients With Multiple Diagnoses

    Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University

    Concomitant speech and language disorders have been identified in 62.8 percent of children who stutter (Blood, Ridenour Jr., Qualls, & Scheffner Hammer, 2003). Many practicing speech-language pathologists (SLPs) lack confidence in treating fluency disorders, often due to lack of training during their academic program (Brisk, Healey, & Hux, 1997; Scaler Scott, Grossman & Tetnowski, 2010; Yaruss, 1999; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002). Other fluency disorders such as cluttering and atypical disfluencies have been increasingly identified among students with concomitant communication disorders (Scott, Tetnowski, Flaitz, & Yaruss, 2014; Tetnowski, Richels, Shenker, Sisskin & Wolk, 2012). In this seminar, practical strategies for evaluating and treating clients with fluency disorders and concomitant diagnoses will be covered. Treatment activities for diagnoses including autism spectrum, ADHD, selective mutism, intellectual disability, learning disability, articulation disorders and gifted and talented will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify three principles for working with fluency clients and concomitant disorders.
    • Identify three strategies for differential diagnosis of stuttering, cluttering and atypical disfluency.
    • Identify one treatment strategy for three different concomitant diagnoses.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Seminar 60 - Aspiration: What Do We Know and the Evidence Concerning Typical Treatment Approaches

    Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, Accelerated Care Plus

    Aspiration is a common occurrence in swallowing. Determining when aspiration becomes pathological is a multi-factorial process that requires critical thinking. This seminar will describe research related to predictors of aspiration pneumonia. In addition, the presentation will review the efficacy of common interventions.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List factors influencing the development of pneumonia in the presence of dysphagia.
  • Enumerate various possible complications of aspiration.
  • Describe consequences associated with common interventions (diet modification, liquid modification, feeding tubes).
  • (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Seminar 61 - Counseling: A Vital Skill for SLPs

    Robert Owens, PhD, CCC-SLP, College of St. Rose

    Counseling is included by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists but few graduate programs offer a dedicated course in this essential material. In this 90-minute seminar, Dr. Owens will discuss counseling and offer important practical tips. The seminar will be participatory and use role-play as a teaching tool.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify specific techniques to use when counseling clients.
    • Respond in the moment to comments by clients and to move the intervention process forward.
    • Cite instances when counseling can be an effective intervention tool.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    9:45 am - 11:15 am

    Seminar 62 - Cochlear Implant Awareness and Knowledge Among Healthcare Professionals

    Susan Dillmuth-Miller, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA; Alexis Rodgers, MS, CCC-SLP; Brooke Lyons; Elizabeth Hawley, from East Stroudsburg University

    Multi-channel cochlear implants were first approved in the United States in 1985, and are now viewed as a life changing intervention. However, many who meet candidacy criteria have not received cochlear implants. Cochlear implant candidacy continues to expand to include those with unilateral hearing loss, lesser degrees of hearing loss and better word recognition. Audiologists, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and physicians are gatekeepers for referrals for cochlear implants. Lack of awareness among health care professionals has been identified as a reason for candidates not to pursue implantation. This seminar will focus on the health care professional and their knowledge of candidacy. A survey was developed and distributed to physicians to assess their knowledge about cochlear implants and candidacy. These results will be discussed. In the past, SLPs also showed lack of awareness of cochlear implant candidacy (Watson & Martin, 1999), and more recently, 50 percent of SLPs rated their knowledge regarding cochlear implants as inadequate (Ward, Grubb & Biswas, 2018). SLPs requested more knowledge regarding discussing the parts of an implant, knowing when to make a referral for cochlear implants, conducting listening checks and changing a battery. Training in these areas of need will be provided. Case studies will be presented to discuss candidacy. Instruction will be provided in conducting listening checks and changing a battery.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Summarize how cochlear implant candidacy has expanded.
    • Describe who would be an appropriate referral based on audiometric criteria.
    • Demonstrate how to change batteries, conduct listening checks and name the parts of an implant.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Seminar 63 - Dysphagia Management: Compensation or Rehabilitation

    Ed Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP, Accelerated Care Plus

    When providing treatment for individuals with dysphagia, the speech-language pathologist is required to determine an appropriate approach. Some approaches compensate for deficits and others attempt to rehabilitate swallowing. This presentation will review interventions and consider their possible impact on the swallow.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Verbalize the difference between compensation and rehabilitation.
    • List common compensatory interventions.
    • List rehabilitative interventions.
    • Verbalize the role of neuroplastic principles in the swallow rehabilitation.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Seminar 64 - Functional Language Intervention: Why and How

    Robert Owens, PhD, CCC-SLP, College of St. Rose

    The term "Functional Language Intervention" has been in our field for at least 20 years. It's vaguely described in our grad school curricula, but the instructors somehow forgot to present any techniques beyond cuing and reinforcing. In fact, there are a range of strategies and techniques to explore in this 90-minute seminar.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Provide a rationale for using a functional approach to language intervention.
    • Discuss using verbal and nonverbal contexts in intervention.
    • Perform conversational intervention.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    11:30 am - 1:00 pm

    Seminar 65 - Adding the Early Start Denver Model to Early Intervention

    Barbara Weber, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, Private Practice; Merle Crawford, Private Practice

    The Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) is a fusion of developmental, relationship-based and behavioral interventions for young children who are on the autism spectrum or who have red flags/concerns that they may be on the autism spectrum. It is a comprehensive program that incorporates assessment and progress monitoring across developmental domains. The ESDM incorporates collaboration with parents and other caregivers and is implemented across a variety of routines. This seminar will highlight what the ESDM is, the research behind the model and the experiences of two early intervention providers who pursued certification in the ESDM and who have been using it in conjunction with coaching practices to impact children and families.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss research regarding the ESDM.
    • Discuss the certification process.
    • Describe the presenters' experiences with implementation of the ESDM in home-based early intervention settings.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Seminar 66 - How Can SLPs Help Enhance Communication Skills in Selective Mutism

    Sharon Lee Armstrong, PhD, La Salle University; Janice Gordon, MS, CCC-SLP, Private Practice; Donna Spillman-Kennedy, MS, CCC-SLP, Integrated Speech Pathology, LLC; Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, La Salle University; Carolyn Gerber Satko, MS, CCC-SLP, The School District of Lancaster

    In this seminar, participants will learn about children with selective mutism (SM), some basic rules for successfully interacting with them, and how to use EXPRESS to systematically promote social engagement, communication skills and literacy. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need effective strategies to serve children with SM, a social communication anxiety disorder characterized by a reluctance to speak. This reluctance is rooted in anxiety but is often accompanied by communication deficits that compound the disorder, including: using sufficient words per sentence; using compound and complex sentences; retelling a story; making up a story about a picture; and using imagination to express thoughts. (Klein, Armstrong & Shipon-Blum, 2013). These communication deficits in SM inspired the development of the EXPRESS (EXPanding Receptive and Expressive Skills Through Stories) Program for children ages 3-11. Each EXPRESS session begins with reading one of 25 popular children's stories selected on the basis of the child's age, literacy and lexile levels and communication comfort level (from Shipon-Blum, 2015), which can range from being nonvocal to making phonemic sounds to saying words to producing scripted, and ultimately, spontaneous sentences. Engaging and interactive activities based on the chosen story build vocabulary, phonological awareness and comprehension and production of simple, compound and complex sentences. Subsequently, there are question-answer routines for practicing sentences and modeling the narrative structure of the story. Finally, the SLP and child engage in progressive steps toward story generation accompanied by auditory and visual support using pictures and text. Additionally, EXPRESS incorporates progress monitoring, using charting and working toward motivating rewards.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • List three defining characteristics of SM.
    • List five levels of communication comfort for expanding vocalization and verbalization with children who have SM.
    • Use the levels of communication comfort and literacy and lexile levels to identify a starting point for building communication skills.
    • List five strategies to assist in the treatment of communication deficits in SM.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Seminar 67 - R Made Simple - Innovative Methodology For 'R' Articulation

    Nancy Geruntino, MA, CCC-SLP, Northern Speech Services

    Learn an entirely different approach to 'R' remediation. One that will give your students the ability and the confidence to produce any 'R' sound in any context. One that can be applied to any word with the 'R' sound, including all dialects, plus has application to language and literacy skills. One that can even eliminate the need for multiple 'R' programs. This seminar introduces the concept of the Up, Down and Slide Alphabet. This method is unique, yet easy to teach and simple for the students to learn. Participants will learn to teach students to position the tongue to produce 'R' depending on the letter and sound that precedes the 'R' (Ups, Downs or Slides). This approach, combined with sound discrimination training and motor planning instruction, will help students master 'R' pronunciation at the conversational level, plus address barriers related to spelling, pronunciation and dialect. The components necessary to implement this program will be discussed, including how to establish student ownership of learning. Throughout the seminar, participants will view videos of students receiving instruction and practicing these techniques with success. Opportunities are included for drill practice and hands-on experience using the Up, Down and Slide techniques. In addition, participants will learn how to incorporate these methods into language and literacy goals. It is the presenter's hope that wide implementation of these techniques during the early school years will eliminate 'R' problems in middle school and high school. Focus is on students aged seven to 18.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify correct tongue placement for each category and exercises to build muscle strength for the mastery of the 'R' sound.
    • Identify the Up, Down and Slide alphabet.
    • Categorize which letters and sounds belong in each category of the Up, Down and Slide protocol. The participant will also be able to analyze letters, words, picture cards, poems and stories.
    • As a result of this presentation, the participant will be able to apply the Up, Down and Slide methods to increase vocabulary skills, language skills and strengthen literacy skills.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Technical Sessions 8:00 am – 1:00 pm - Technical Sessions run in 30-minute increments.

    Tech Session 1 - Perception on Formal Instruction in Counseling

    Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, Misericordia University; Orlando Barone, MS, University of Pennsylvania, Danielle Spagnuolo, BS; Brianna Spilsbury; Chantal Whiteduck; Anna Hershey, from Misericordia University

    The importance of integrating counseling into clinical instruction is widely accepted. A solution-focused philosophy offers specific guidance for clinicians as they set goals and help their clients work toward a preferred future. With this knowledge, clinicians will be able to effectively counsel their clients to help them to evaluate emotions related to their communication disorder, helping them to move through therapy and better generalize skills. This technical session will highlight results of a survey sent to licensed speech-language pathologists who took a counseling course in graduate school to determine the importance of gaining specific instruction and knowledge of counseling skills. Participants were asked to answer questions related to the usefulness of this coursework to their careers. Applications to clinical instruction and clinical work will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Explain a solution-focused approach to counseling.
    • List benefits to integrating counseling into clinical education.
    • Explain the steps of the Solution Cycle.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Tech Session 2 - C5 Online: Setting Expectations for Positive Online Social Interactions

    Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates that “testing and evaluation materials and procedures … shall be provided and administered in the child’s native language or modes of communication, unless it clearly is not feasible to do so.” This indicates that all school-based speech-language pathologists are required to assess a child in his or her native language in order to determine whether or not he or she qualifies for speech and language support services. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide information regarding various aspects of Erica Cappellini, MS, CCC-SLP, Lehigh University

    The pervasiveness of technology in the modern world has gifted people with other modes of communication. While some of the nuances of social communication are similar to in-person conversations, online interactions also have their own set of considerations, ambiguities and rules of etiquette. It is especially important for children to know how to navigate their communications online since these can have lasting effects on their lives. From texting to online gaming to Instagram and Snapchat, students need guidance on how to interact with others online. This technical session will highlight the importance of addressing this topic, discuss how clear expectations can positively shape behavior and provide guidelines on key concepts to target. It will look at results from pre-and post-surveys from middle school students with emotional and behavioral disturbances educated on this topic at Centennial School of Lehigh University and will offer recommendations for practice and implementation for other student populations.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of how children use technology and/or how to determine how their children use it.
    • Discuss the importance of teaching communication skills in a virtual world.
    • Identify at least five expectations to discuss with students regarding online communication.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Tech Session 3 - Language Screener Performance by Early and Late Four Year Olds

    Samantha Ward; Rachel Wolf, PhD, CCC-SLP, Faculty Advisor, from East Stroudsburg University

    Speech and language screening is a preventative measure to identify children who would benefit from further evaluation of speech and language skills. Early identification allows intervention to begin at younger ages, and has long-term impacts on improving skills across developmental domains, academic performance and behavior management. This study examines the performance of early and late four year olds on the PLS-5 speech and language screener. There is limited research on the validity of this screener, specifically how results vary within age groups. Results from PLS-5 screeners were retrospectively examined for four year old children in Head Start classrooms. The four year olds were broken up into three age groups: group 1 (4:0-4:4), group 2 (4:4-4:8) and group 3 (4:8-5:0). It was hypothesized that a significantly higher number of children in the older four year old age group would pass the screener when compared to children in the younger four year old age group. This hypothesis was based on research regarding the gradual, progressive nature of language development. Results supported the hypothesis and specific findings, analysis, clinical implications and suggestions for future research will be presented.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe limitations in currently available language screeners.
    • Discuss how age ranges and cultural distinctions impact performance on language screeners.
    • Discuss accommodations that should be made to account for the impact of age related limitations on language screeners.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Tech Session 4 - Assessing Children Who are English Language Learners

    Jill Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    With the increasing linguistic diversity in the United States, speech-language pathologists are being more frequently called upon to assess children who are English Language Learners. In order to validly assess these children (determine the presence of language disorder, language difference or both), the clinician must inform himself/herself of the patterns associated with second language acquisition. In addition, he or she should learn about assessment practices (e.g., dynamic assessment) that can be useful not only differentiating language difference versus disorders, but also in capturing the client's language patterns. This technical session will discuss patterns associated with language acquisition and alternative assessment practices/adaptions that can be utilized. The technical session will describe how various aspects of assessment (for example, collection of case history information, norm-referenced assessment and language sample analysis) can be conducted to increase the validity of assessment for these children.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Define resources for information on various non-English languages and use this information to predict patterns associated with second language acquisition.
    • Describe ways in which alternative practices might be utilized to increase the validity of assessment.
    • Describe ways in which assessment can be conducted in a more culturally sensitive and linguistically sensitive manner.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Tech Session 5 - Confidence and Assumptions About AAC of SLPs Practicing in Schools

    Eric Sanders, PhD, CCC-SLP, Moravian College; Thomas Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Deborah Lesher, MS, CCC-SLP, Columbia Regional Program

    Over half of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practicing in schools report working with a student who requires augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) (ASHA, 2018). Currently, there is little evidence that documents SLP confidence and assumptions related to assessment, intervention or the use of AAC tools by SLPs providing AAC services in schools. Myriad factors may influence each of these areas. For example, AAC expertise and experience of the SLP may influence assessment practices (Deitz, Quach, Lund, McKelvey, 2012; Lund, Quach, Weissling, McKelvey & Dietz, 2017) and self-assurance in delivering evidence-based intervention and related practices (e.g., training communication partners, selecting vocabulary). Additionally, knowledge and confidence about the wide range of clinical AAC tools that SLPs may similarly be influenced by these same types of factors. Finally, to understand AAC practices by SLPs in educational settings, it is also important to explore their views about assumptions and myths related to AAC (e.g., whether AAC is a last communicative resort, whether there are cognitive prerequisites necessary to use AAC) that have been historically viewed as concerning in the field (e.g., Romski & Sevcik, 2005). The purpose of this technical session is to present results of an anonymous survey designed to comprehensively examine the confidence, knowledge and beliefs of SLPs who work in educational settings of assessment, intervention, use of clinical tools and myths in relation to demographic factors that may contribute to these factors. This information may contribute to our understanding of how AAC services are provided by SLPs in educational settings.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the confidence of SLPs providing AAC services in schools relative to AAC assessment, intervention and use of clinical tools.
    • Identify the level of agreement of SLPs about common myths and assumptions related to AAC.
    • Describe demographic factors that may impact confidence in AAC assessment, intervention and use of clinical tools and belief in certain AAC-related myths.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Tech Session 6 - Optimal Easy Onset Stretch Duration for Stuttering Therapy: Cortical/Psychophysical Variables

    D'manda Price, BS; Glen Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F; Denis Anson, MS; Cari Tellis, PhD, CCC-SLP; Kathleen Scaler Scott, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, from Misericordia University

    Easy onsets (stretching the vowel to induce fluency) are often used in many stuttering therapy programs. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether typically fluent speakers (TFS) demonstrate differences in hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain and corresponding autonomic nervous system changes when listening to a person who stutters produce words with the first vowel being stretched (easy onsets) at varying durations (e.g., .25-second, .5-second and 1-second) to determine which level of stretch is most preferred by TFS. This study utilized autonomic nervous system (ANS) software and hardware, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and an online survey. TFS listened to the following tasks: words with a .25-second vowel stretch, words with a .5-second vowel stretch and words with a 1-second vowel stretch. Following the audio portion of this study, participants were asked to rate the naturalness of each task as well as to provide a rating of the most preferred stretch. Results indicated that listeners had a higher heart rate as well as differences in hemoglobin concentration changes in both hemispheres when listening to a 1-second vowel stretch compared to other durations. The survey revealed that participants felt as though the 1-second stretch was the most unnatural and the .25-second stretch was the most natural. This study has implications for future fluency therapy, as it provides information for clients and clinicians about what duration of stretching vowels is the most acceptable for typically fluent listeners.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Develop a better understanding of fNIRS.
    • Develop a better understanding of ANS software and hardware.
    • Decide the most acceptable duration for stretching vowels in fluency therapy.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Tech Session 7 - Role of Training and Evaluating Self-Care Ability in Laryngectomy Population

    Kimberly Eichhorn, MS, CCC-SLP, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; Ronda Winans-Mitrik, MA, CCC-SLP, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System; William Hula, PhD, CCC-SLP, VAPHS Geriatric Resesarch, Education and Clinical Center and the University of Pittsburgh

    Patients undergoing total laryngectomy are at high risk for post-operative complications and readmission. Factors such as ability to perform self-care of the new and only airway and/or Tracheal Esophageal Prosthesis (TEP) can directly influence readmission rates. At VA Pittsburgh (VAPHS), speech-language pathology leads the pre-/post-operative education process and TEP candidacy screening, but because of the high complexity associated with this population, patient education is delivered in a multidisciplinary approach. Providers at VAPHS have implemented a pre-operative counseling and routine post-operative education/training protocol for patients undergoing laryngectomy using educational materials (video, brochure, assessment tools) that are unique to our facility. Over time, the educational processes and screening procedures have been modified to include factors we believe impact a patient's ability to acquire self-care skills such as visual acuity, fine motor skills, cognitive status, co-occurring diagnoses and support system. Performance on knowledge assessment and skill demonstration in the acute phase of recovery can provide guidance on disposition recommendations. Retrospective chart reviews were completed on all patients (n=55) undergoing total laryngectomy at VAPHS since 2010 to review effectiveness of training, attempt to identify predictive factors for success, disposition and readmission. Readmission rates due to self-care deficiencies have been low (four percent). Veterans transferred to subacute rehabilitation, within our healthcare system, for additional training and support have been equally successful with 70 percent returning to pre-admission living arrangements and no readmissions due to self-care deficiencies. Hospitals with low volumes of total laryngectomy procedures can have positive outcomes when a comprehensive, multidisciplinary pre- and post-operative laryngectomy education program is in place.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Describe risk factors for readmission in the TL population.
    • Generate a clinical education process for training self-care post TL.
    • Discuss factors that should be considered in discharge planning, including optimal use of d/c resources.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

    Tech Session 8 - Voice Therapy for Transgender Voice Clients

    Cassidy Quick, BS; Emily Catinella, BS; Elizabeth Grillo, PhD, CCC-SLP, Faculty Advisor, from West Chester University

    Two transgender clients participated in behavioral voice therapy at West Chester University's Speech and Hearing Clinic during spring and summer of 2018. Estill's Figures and Qualities (Estill, Klimeck, Obert, & Steinhauer, 2009 a,b) were used as the stimulability component of the Global Voice Therapy Model (GVTM; Grillo, 2012, 2017). This presentation will describe the methods used to combine Estill's Figures and Qualities with the GVTM, demonstrate the model through video examples and present pre- and post-therapy results.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Define the components of the Global Voice Therapy Model.
    • Describe Estill's Figures and Qualities used with the clients.
    • Identify differences between pre- and post-therapy results.

    (Instructional Level: Introductory)

    Tech Session 9 - "Up Your Nose With a Rubber Hose!" NG Tube Considerations

    Audrey Rozell, MA, CCC-SLP; Pamela Sheffler, MA, CCC-SLP; Bethany Villella, MS, CCC-SLP, from UPMC Centers for Rehab Services

    A community-based hospital examined whether naso-gastric (NG) feeding tubes impacted the swallow function of their patients. Using videofluoroscopy, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and radiologist examined the swallow function of patients with the NG tube in place. They removed the NG tube during the procedure and examined the patient's swallowing function again. This initial sample of patients lead to a QI project and the implementation of MBSImP to compare the scores of each patient pre- and post NG tube removal.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss a review of literature pertaining to NG tubes.
    • Discuss whether NG tubes can impact swallow function.
    • Describe how instrumental assessment can promote safer swallowing in patients with NG tubes.

    (Instructional Level: Intrermediate)

    Tech Session 10 - Word Finding and Executive Functioning in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    LuAnn Batson-Magnuson, PhD, East Stroudsburg University

    This technical session will provide the framework and preliminary results of a prospective study of word finding and executive functioning performance in clients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The technical session will look at patient perceptions and patient performance. The relationship between pain and fatigue will be discussed. The role of the speech-language pathologist in the identification of patient needs and treatment will be addressed.

    Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify two examples of the impact of RA on the brain.
    • Describe areas of language that are a concern for patients with RA.
    • Describe areas of cognition that are a concern for patients with RA.
    • Describe the SLP's role in the evaluation and treatment of patients with RA.

    (Instructional Level: Intermediate)

     

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